Wood Wide Web

Wood Wide Web

Have you ever thought that trees can also socialize like human?  If you never ever thought this way, then I would suggest you to spend at most five minutes of your time reading this article to know a fantastic truth about trees.

Trees may communicate, trade, and even fight war against one another, according to new research. Suzanne Simard, a forest ecologist, discovered that trees communicate with one another in 1997. She demonstrated in her experiment that a Douglas Fir and a Paper Birch tree can interact and trade radioactive carbons while being far away from each other.

The fact that plants and fungi in the soil have a symbiotic relationship is not new to humans. The fungi take nutrients from the trees, while the trees receive sugars from the fungi. But the story doesn’t end there. There has been found proof about trees sharing a connection with each other through this fungal network. This network is called as Mycorrhizal Fungi Network which can also be called as Wood Wide Web.

Trees may share their nutrients with one another according to their needs thanks to this shared connection. They can assist one another in raising their defenses in times of danger by sharing risk information and sending chemical signals to one another. Besides, the mother trees easily feed sugars to the seedlings through this network system. Furthermore, if one tree dies, the other trees connected to it via the Wood Wide Web can absorb its nutrients and become healthier as a result.

The Wood Wide Web, like the World Wide Web, has its dark sides too. Some trees do harm to their neighbors by depleting nutrients or producing dangerous substances. Orchids, for example, are a type of hacker plant that steals nutrients from a shared connection.

The reality of this Wood Wide Web is so fantastic and mesmerizing. The next time you walk through a forest, take a moment to think about the deep network link that runs through your feet.

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